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How to Save On Batteries

Used batteries.

 

Billions of batteries are wasted each year. Here are some ways on how to save on batteries and use less of them.

 

Here are some tips on how to save on batteries around the house.

 

Do you ever look in a drawer and wonder if those batteries are good or bad? Sometimes AA and AAA batteries are not quite good enough for a digital camera or high power consumption device yet will work fine in a low consumption device such as a remote control, for many more months.

One thing that I do to save money on batteries is mark disposable carbon batteries with a sharpie pen with the letter U for used if it has come out of a high amp device like a digital camera. I put them aside in a drawer and use them for my remote controls.  When they are used up I throw them in the trash.

I also use rechargeable batteries to save money on batteries whenever I can.

The life of a rechargeable battery can be as much as a hundred recharges, but you will not get as much run time, about a third less than disposable batteries such as Duracell or Energizer. For critical items, such as the walkie talkies we take hiking, or smoke detectors, I use long life disposable ones.

For everything else, Crest electric toothbrushes, etc, I use the Ni-Mh or Nikel Metal Hydride,  ones.  Some older rechargeable batteries are NiCd or Nikel Cadmium. 

You should not throw these in the trash. You could, of course, but then you would be an evil person since cadmium is very toxic and will end up sooner or later in rivers and lakes.

There are places that take Nicads  and Ni-Mh batteries back, as well as the power packs for drills, cell phone batteries, etc. Home Depot and Lowes do.

If you figure that a  two pack of rechargeable AA batteries can be reused thirty times, and  costs around $10 dollars, and a two pack of Duracells costs $3.00 then you are looking at a significant savings, not to mention the fact that you are throwing so many used batteries in the landfill.

One tip that will save on batteries is to not  partially charge rechargeable batteries then use them.

This will cause them to develop a "memory" and not fully charge up again. Keep them on the charger until the indicator turns green. 

 Energizer and other brands now make rechargeable batteries that are sold at Wal Mart and home improvement stores.

A New Innovation, Chargers For Alkaline Batteries

A relatively new product on the market, the  Renu-It, allows you to recharge common alkaline batteries. You can actually reuse alkaline batteries like Energizer and Duracell several times if you renew them in a charger specially designed for alkaline batteries. Since these chargers also allow you to recharge NiCD and NiMH batteries you get the best of both worlds. For best results when recharging alkaline batteries don't run the all the way down before placing them in the renewer.

 

 

 

 

 

Cheers.

    

 

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